How to Hire a Product Manager

How to Hire a Product Manager

Building a software product is complex, it involves tedious planning and prioritization. Things can easily go downhill if you don’t have the right person to manage the entire development process.  If you’re looking for ways to improve your team’s development progress or you need someone to take over the nitty-gritty parts of development, here is a good read to learn more about the software development life cycle and how to hire a product manager.  

To successfully sell software, a business needs to solve a critical market problem, understand the market, and develop the product it needs. Hence, the need for product management as a core business function in software companies.


Often, creating a software product can get complicated when it is not managed well. Product creation entails a meticulous list of requirements, specific timeframes, constant communication between client and team members, and documentation for each phase of the project.

There are many factors to consider if you’re having problems in product development. You might be doing something wrong or you’re lacking an essential part of your team. 

If you’re looking for a way to improve your team’s performance, then it’s best to learn about how software development works in its entirety. The best way to develop a product is to learn about the most effective strategies to streamline and expedite the process. 

Speak to an expert now about building your software team.

 

Hiring a Product Manager

In hiring a product manager for your company, you need to understand what kind of expertise is necessary for your project. Here are the skills you should consider: 

  • Leadership skills – to manage the team effectively and evaluate each member’s skills for task distribution. 
  • Experience – relevant experience or familiarity with the project and industry. 
  • Business Analysis – to analyze the market and competitive conditions, lay out the product vision and find out what differentiates it from competitors. 

In interviewing a product manager, ask questions about their product management skills: technical knowledge, business sense, leadership experience, and decision-making abilities.

Where to Hire a Product Manager

Hiring people in the software industry is especially difficult if you’re not familiar with the technical aspects of it. The most ideal option is to tap into a company that has first-hand experience in providing manpower for startups.   

Full Scale has a roster of seasoned software experts that can cater to all your development project needs. We’ve carefully picked out the cream of the crop and assessed their skills and work ethic to ensure that you acquire the best people to work with. We can take care of the nitty-gritty process of hiring and managing the staff so you can focus on your product. We can help you assemble your very own development team for your project. 

Product Managers in Software Development

Product Managers in Software Development

Software development follows a certain process that features multiple phases of product creation. It tackles all stages from establishing requirements up to deployment and maintenance. 

The Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) serves as a guide for systematic to streamline processes and implement plans in a systematic and disciplined manner. The Software Development Life Cycle ensures the quality of your product and that it is maintained post-release. 

The SDLC phases comprise the inception up to the retirement of the software product. These phases include six major steps: requirements and analysis, designing, implementation, testing, deployment, and maintenance. The one who puts these into practice and keeps track of its implementation is the software product manager.

The product manager owns the business strategy of a product. He or she is the person responsible for defining the why, when, and what of the product that the engineering team builds. This means they lead cross-functional teams from a product’s conception all the way through to its launching. The position is also responsible for analyzing data and resolving roadblocks encountered during development.

Here are some  key functions of a Product Manager:

  1. Product Vision – The product manager sets the product vision and pursues a client-centric strategy to reach it. The goal is to articulate the intent and value of the product, giving a clear definition of its desired functions, its impact, and its contribution to the market.  The product manager creates a roadmap and organizes the priorities based on the requirements. They hold intensive brainstorming sessions with the client and the team to map out the direction of the product and identify the best ways to build it.
  2. Timeline – The product manager establishes a timeline, sets key points, and coordinates all the activities that will lead up to the product’s release. This includes bridging gaps between different functions within the company and aligning all the parties involved in the project. Responsibilities also include managing dependencies in and across releases to complete release phases and milestones. A product manager has to resolve problems while keeping the roadmap focused on the outcome.   
  3. Ideation – One of the most challenging problems encountered in software development is choosing which ideas are beneficial and relevant to the product and should be included as a feature. Building a product requires a lot of creativity and technical research so the product manager has to be open to ideas but firm in integrating the client’s vision for the product. A product manager’s job is to develop and curate ideas the team or the client pitches in. Once these ideas are approved and promoted into features, they will serve as key objectives for the team’s development strategy. The product manager is also responsible for communicating all feedback and requests and seamlessly integrating them during the actual development phase.
  4. Communication – Product managers have to work closely with the client and the team to ensure that the technical requirement and their timeframes are reasonably negotiated. In making difficult trade-offs about the product, a product manager’s decision is based on the desired user experience and the client’s vision for it in the market.  A product manager will listen to the ‘voice’ of the market through research. This comprises of gathering, testing, and analyzing data, getting direct customer feedback, and by using business intelligence through internal sales and customer service teams.
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Offshore Talents

Escape this whole tedious process of hiring product managers when you shoot us a message. At Full Scale, we deliver only the best software development team members: developers, testers, and managers! Our vision is to give business software development teams fast and affordably. So what are you waiting for? Contact us to learn more about our services.

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